Isabel Sarli Bares All

Argentinian sexpot Isabel Sarli stars in the 1969 drama that was also known as NUDE IN THE SAND and ALONE ON THE BEACH.

Nude in the Sand sounds like one of those sex-themed cocktails with names like Between the Sheets, Strip and Run Naked and Sex on the Beach that are offered at trendy under 30 bars but no. It is the English language title of Furia Sexual: Desnuda en la Arena (1969), which is also known as Alone on the Beach, and stars Argentinian sexpot Isabel Sarli. If you know the name, it is probably because cult director John Waters is a big admirer of Sarli’s films and has regularly screened Fuego (1969), probably her most infamous and delightfully campy opus, to stunned audiences over the years. Nude in the Sand may not top the delirious highs and lows of Fuego but it is an enjoyably trashy introduction to the voluptuous Sarli for novices as well as a must-see for fans of Fuego.

Continue reading

Oscar Oddities, Part 1

CON AIR (1997), Oscar nominee for Best Original Song and Best Sound.

Every year in the annual Oscar race there are always a few surprises, head scratchers or genuinely odd contenders that make you wonder how they were ever selected. Was it politics? Was it a fluke? Did good taste or bad taste actually triumph? Here is a list of my favorite oddities, some of which deserved their nomination though I never expected the Academy to acknowledge them because they were either low-budget indies, big budget genre pictures or under the radar movies that were barely noticed by moviegoers. I’m using the 1990s as my starting point and working backwards from there, cherry picking specific Oscar races, since most of the more interesting anomalies occurred prior to the 21st century.

Yes, there have been a few unexpected contenders since then such as 2000’s strange and mesmerizing Shadow of the Vampire (nominated for Best Supporting Actor – Willem Dafoe) and Hustle & Flow featuring the Oscar winning Best Original Song of 2005 – “It’s Hard Out Here For a Pimp.” In fact, the Best Original Song Oscar category is usually the place to look for oddball entries such as “Blame Canada” from South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut (1999) by the demented director-writer team of Trey Parker and Matt Stone or “How Do I Live,” written by Diane Warren and performed by Trisha Yearwood in Con Air (1997), an outrageous over-the-top action thriller from producer Jerry Bruckheimer. But, in general, the Academy Award nominations from 1999 on back to the beginning were quirkier and more fun.

Continue reading

The Way of All Flesh

Every once in a while a low-budget independent film with a no-name cast will come along and captivate critics and audiences alike with its audaciousness, honesty and ability to transcend easy categorization. In the film industry, they sometimes call this a “sleeper” and, while this kind of movie rarely becomes a box office hit, it can acquire a cult status or insider buzz that saves it from falling off the radar and vanishing into obscurity. Such is the case with A Cold Wind in August (1961), a steamy little adult drama that was targeted for grindhouses and the drive-in trade with the tagline: “If you care about love, you’ll talk about a teenage boy and a woman who is all allure, all tenderness…all tragedy.” The poster depicted two lovers in a torrid horizontal embrace while the figure of an exotic stripper, dressed in an open cape and eye mask, towers over them, revealing her shapely, half-naked body.
Continue reading

Bowling, Pizza and Small Town Dreamers

Gary Lundgren is a writer/director who has been making feature films since 2009 but you might not have heard of him unless you came across one of his movies at a film festival. Despite a lack of exposure and spotty film distribution, he continues to go his own way and Phoenix, Oregon, his new film and fourth directorial effort, might possibly connect with audiences looking for something a little more personal and character-driven than the typical summer blockbuster releases. Continue reading

The President We Deserve

Timothy Carey (on throne) plays a self-proclaimed messiah who starts his own political party in the underground satire, The World’s Greatest Sinner (1962).

You might not know the name but you know the face. One of the most eccentric character actors in American cinema, he has had the rare distinction of working with everyone from James Dean and Elia Kazan (East of Eden) to Marlon Brando (The Wild One; One-Eyed Jacks) to Stanley Kubrick (The Killing; Paths of Glory) to John Cassavetes (Minnie and Moskowitz; The Killing of a Chinese Bookie) to The Monkees (their feature debut Head) to Mr. T, Bill Maher and Gary Busey in D.C. Cab. Let me add a few more to that already impressive filmography which includes appearing with Clark Gable (Across the Wide Missouri), Francis the Talking Mule (Francis in the Navy) and Shelley Winters and Debbie Reynolds (What’s the Matter With Helen?) and god knows who else. We’re talking about Timothy Carey and probably his greatest role is the one you’ve never seen – The World’s Greatest Sinner (1962).  Continue reading